Subscribe to our mailing list

Email Format
Close

Image by Stacy Spensley

When it comes to packing lunches (and other kitchen tasks)… this lady likes to keep it simple. A little bit of fresh fruit, veggies, and some sort of protein and I’m happy.

Most people love the classic sandwich as a lunch item. But taking the time each morning to slice tomatoes, cheese, turkey and assemble all of the above with the other sandwich toppings of your choice? Too time-consuming in my book (yes, I’m aware how ridiculous this sounds… but I’m not a morning person).

Hence I fell in love with chicken salad. I can whip it together on Sunday and then spoon some over a piece of bread or fresh butter lettuce each morning in 15 seconds flat. Boom. Lunch conquered.

But then I began to learn about all that is real food and nutrition… and suddenly my beloved Miracle Whip (one of the base ingredients in my chicken salad) wasn’t looking so miraculous anymore. Soybean oil, cornstarch (likely GMO), sugar, and “natural flavor”? Yikes!

So I set off to make my own mayo for my beloved chicken salad. And failed. Miserably.

Apparently my partly broken food-processor (which will only pulse once before having to be unplugged and plugged back in in order to work, then repeat) isn’t up for the necessary task of emulsification.

What was that? Yes, I just used the word emulsification, the long form of emulsify or emulsion - which basically refers to the process of magically (or through some long scientific explanation) suspending one liquid in another liquid until it forms something new entirely.

Yolk & Oil - The Foundation of Homemade Mayo

Yolk & Oil – The Foundation of Homemade Mayo

Enter Mayo: which, at it’s core, is simply emulsified egg yolk and oil.

Which sounds simple. Except when it’s not. Until I employed my handy dandy… stick blender! (AKA immersion blender)

Immersion Blender - The Secret to Easy Homemade Mayo

Immersion Blender – The Secret to Easy Homemade Mayo

This tool, which you can find for around $35 online, will change your life in the best way possible (and let you sleep in those super sweet extra ten minutes in the mornings). It doesn’t get better than this right?

To make your mayo, simply add the ingredients in the recipe below into a tall glass bowl or container. The key here is to find one with a slightly narrow bottom so that you don’t have to move the stick blender around too much, and the ingredients will easily emulsify.

 

Once you’ve added your ingredients, take your stick blender and press it to the bottom of the bowl and blend, slowly pulling up until you’ve got a nice thick mayo consistency. Just like that, you’ve got healthy, homemade mayo in 30-seconds or less! (In my demonstration video below, it took about 19 seconds… Booyah!)

Here’s an unedited video demonstration below.

(I’m not sure why my voice became muffled at the end, but I was just explaining that if you see any small amounts of residual oil around the edges of the bowl, you can simply fold that in at the end. Don’t be tempted to re-emulsify with your stick blender… because over emulsified mayo can get a nasty texture!)

30-Second Homemade Mayo

Ingredients

  • 1 Egg Yolk
  • 3/4 Cup Olive Oil
  • 1/4 Teaspoon Salt
  • 1 Teaspoon Dijon Mustard
  • 2 Teaspoons Apple Cider Vinegar (I like a little bit of acidic bite to my mayo... if you prefer it to be more mellow, you might lower this to 1 teaspoon and then add more as needed.)
  • Optional Ingredients: Fresh/Dried Herbs, Lemon Juice, Minced Garlic, Etc.

Instructions

  1. Place all ingredients in a taller glass bowl with a narrow bottom. (Feel free to experiment with any "fun" flavor add-ins as listed in the optional ingredients!)
  2. Use a stick blender to emulsify, starting at the bottom and slowly pulling up until it has a reached a thick "mayo" consistency.
  3. Fold in any residual oil around the edges.
Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by ZipList Recipe Plugin
http://www.modernalternativekitchen.com/2013/04/30-second-homemade-mayo-video/

**This post has been entered into Waste Not Want Not Wednesday, Whole Foods Wednesday, Allergy Free Wednesday, Fresh Foods Link Up, and Frugal Days Sustainable Ways.**

This is the writings of:

Britt @ Honest to Goodness Living
Britt and her husband, Jake, hitched onto the real food wagon January of 2012 after her “natural pregnancy” internet search led (and sold) her to all that is wonderful about real, nourishing food. She is a self-described “throw-down cook” (meaning she just throws things in and goes with it) and loves to teach people how easy and delicious it can be to just “go with the flow” in the kitchen. She currently lives life in Tulsa with her handsome husband and miniature schnauzer, Riley Mae, as a “bringing-home-the-bacon” wife of a med student – but looks forward to being a stay-at-home mom with future kiddos (including some littles she hopes to adopt). She loves playing dominos, leading worship, the French language, “Freebird” by Lynryd Skynyrd, Vietnamese food, and Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee. Check out her blog, Honest to Goodness Living, as she blogs about striving to be authentic in an artificial world – getting “real” about the way we live, love, and eat.

Like what you just read? Stay in touch with our newsletter!

Email Format

20 Comments

  1. Will a small food processor work? I do not want to invest in anymore appliances.

    Reply

    • Tiffany – Yes! If your food processor has a little hole on top… you’ll just need to slowly drizzle in the olive oil while blending to help it emulsify! But totally doable! It’s what I did for a long time before discovering the stick blender trick!

      Reply

  2. My batch totally bombed. Sigh. I have three potential theories:
    1. My dijon mustard was “grainy”, not smooth
    2. I used the plastic measuring cup that came with my stick blender, instead of glass
    3. My stick blender doesn’t seem nearly as powerful as yours did in the video
    Do you think any of these three might be to blame? I couldn’t get the mixture to thicken up *at all*, and it’s just a runny liquid that gradually separates out to its component parts.
    Any suggestions?

    Reply

    • Hm… Here would be my suggestion… Try doubling the recipe (there might not have been enough based on the size of your cup to get it to emulsify). Also, wait to fold in the dijon until after it’s blended (it’s just for flavor). And try a glass (never tried plastic so not sure if that would cause an issue or not) dish that has a bottom that is only wide enough to fit the stick blender, no wider. Best of luck! :)

      Reply

      • Same thing just happened to us. I so wanted this to work! We doubled it and switched to a glass jar per your suggestion and tried again, but it still failed. Yours looks amazing though!

        Reply

  3. I wish I had a stick blender. I made homemade mayo once, but it took at least 20 minutes in my processor. I had to really slowly drip the oil in so it would not separate. It totally worked, which was great, but it took so long that it doesn’t feel worth it some times. But it is almost impossible to find mayo without soy or canola. Yuck!

    Reply

  4. i have made my own for years i make it like yours adding parsley and garlic in the beginning i use a whole egg it always works if it curdles you just start again with a fresh egg and put curdled mayo in slowly and it will work

    Reply

  5. i have – repeatedly – failed miserably at making my own mayo in the past. i think i try to pour it all together too quickly. i’ll have to try your method next time. hand blender. yes. :)

    Thank you for sharing with us at the Wednesday Fresh Foods Link Up! I hope to see you again this week with more seasonal & real food posts. Thanks! xo, kristy

    Reply

  6. This is awesome! I usually use my stick blender to make mayo but I slowly drizzle the oil in – which takes 5+ minutes and by the time it’s 3/4 done the motor starts to overheat. It’s a painful process. I’ve been planning on making tuna salad for awhile but the thought of making mayo was a major turn off – not anymore! Thanks!

    Reply

  7. Love homemade mayo! Great recipe. I am featuring this recipe tonight on AFW!! Thanks for sharing. :-)

    Be Well,
    –Amber

    Reply

  8. Hi! I was wondering what stick blender you use? Thanks :)

    Reply

  9. Mine did not emulsify either, until I did one thing…I let it set and get to room temperature then tried again…it worked! So, I think all ingredients need to be at room temperature before you start.

    Reply

  10. Sigh. Like Colleen and Jennifer, it didn’t work for me either. I soooo want to be able to make homemade mayo. It’s such a disappointment to throw all of those ingredients away. I know it can be done, because I’ve seen other videos like yours. I wish I knew the missing piece.

    Reply

    • Hi Eileen! Did you let the ingredients all come to room temperature first?

      Reply

    • Hi Eileen! The only thing I can think other than the other suggestions offered is to see what kind of stick blender you have? It seems to be a pattern that some stick blenders just aren’t powerful enough to take care of the emulsification process?

      Reply

  11. Hmm, this totally flopped for me. I had wondered if it was too good to be true. Not sure if you have to have a super high powered stick blender or what, but mine sure didn’t work at all. Guess I’ll have to wait until I get a stand mixer to try mayo again. Bummer.

    Reply

    • It didn’t work for me either the first time around. I think I pulled the stick blender up a little too fast. But now I’ve got it! Keep trying – it just takes a little practice to get the technique down pat.

      Reply

  12. [...] 30-Second Homemade Mayo by Britt Fisher, Contributing [...]

    Reply

  13. [...] Mayonnaise — We don't like it and never eat it, so I don't make that!  You can make it in 30 seconds though, using healthy oils, so if you use a lot, it's worth it. [...]

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Back to Top