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Today’s Daily Tip: If you say you will start something in a week it will never happen. Get what you need to make the changes now. Make your commitment and stick to it for a month. I know it is hard. I know it is a lot of work. I know you can do this. (Amanda Klenner-Labrow, Natural Living Mamma)

Snacks. One of the trickiest parts of your diet to transition to “real foods.” We all want something we can just grab and eat. Now. Like, baby’s gotta nurse, toddler’s gotta nap, momma’s gotta eat now.

You Can Do Better Than Store-Bought Snacks

Since you are trying to clean up your diet (especially those who are following along with 31 Days to Better Health and Wellness), you’ve started reading the ingredients on those boxes of granola bars and crackers and fruit snacks. And you’re not happy about what you see.

I’m not happy about them either. Which is why I’ve stopped buying snacks.

I could shell out extra cash for the super-pricey, organic “healthy snacks,” but chances are they aren’t much better. They still contain rancid oils like canola and soybean. If they are grain based, they are either nutritionless white flour or unsoaked, hard-to-digest, whole grain flour. The nuts in your Lara Bar are certainly not soaked, and I guarantee that any granola your can buy in the store is so loaded with so much sugar that it might as well be a cookie.

Which, again, is why I’ve stopped buying snacks.

And you know what? It’s really not that hard to make your own snacks!

The Snack Challenge

It takes time, yes. So don’t try to do it all at once. But if you can find 15 minutes of hands-on time to spend making snacks each week, you’ll be well on your way. So here is your challenge:

Choose the store-bought snack your family relies on most, and make a homemade version instead.

For our family, it’s granola. I make a big batch of my Perfect Soaked Granola every week, and we gobble it up.

Do you love wheat thins? Graham crackers? Fruit snacks? Granola bars? Whatever it is, there is a homemade version out there.  Here are some ideas to get you started!

Homemade Snack Ideas Galore

Looking for something crunchy?

Raw Chai Granola (Grain-Free) by the Spinach Spot

Raw “Ranch” Flax Crackers by the Spinach Spot

Homemade Popcorn with 11 Flavor Variations by MAK

Honey Glazed Almonds by MAK

Something fruity?

Homemade Fruit Roll-Ups by Riddlelove

Homemade Healthy Fruit Snacks from Thank Your Body

Apple Chips by Riddlelove

Need a replacement for your favorite energy bars?

Energy Bars by MAK

White Chocolate Macadamia Lara(ish) Bar by Riddlelove

Carob Coconut Bites by Plus Other Good Stuff

Healthy Cookie Dough Bites by Plus Other Good Stuff, or this version by Riddlelove

There are also a lot of great ideas in the eBook Healthy Snacks to Go, including wheat thins, several power bar recipes, granola and granola bars.

And here’s one more idea:  Homemade Graham Cracker Bites. They are made with soaked whole wheat and barley flours, lightly sweetened with unrefined sweeteners, and perfectly seasoned with cinnamon and cloves. And they’re bite-sized! As with many real food recipes, it may look like a lot of steps, but the hand-on time is very minimal. Give them a try!

 [amd-zlrecipe- recipe:38]

So, which snack are you going to make from scratch? You can do it!

**This post has been entered into Simple Lives Thursday #130 and Keep It Real Thursdays.**

 

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5 Comments

  1. [...] Having trouble figuring out which snacks are healthy for your family? Modern Alternative Kitchen shares some great options and shares a recipe for homemade graham cracker bites in Yes, You Can Make Your Own Snacks! [...]

    Reply

  2. [...] 1. Buy from a company with a high turnover rate. Chances are good that whole wheat flour at the grocery store has been sitting there at room temperature for awhile before it even gets to your house. Try buying whole grain flour from a local health food store that grinds their own, or ordering from a whole foods Co-Op with high turnover. Here in West MI, I sometimes buy Wheat Montana flour from Country Life Natural Foods. They also grind at low temps which helps prevent some rancidity and preserves more nutrients. 2. Tightly seal. As soon as you get your flour home, put it in an air-tight container or Ziplock. Keeping out air and moisture will help it stay fresh longer. 3. Refrigerate or freeze your flour. If you have room in your freezer, place your fresh, sealed whole grain flour in there. It will last for several months. If not, put it in the second best place: the fridge. Every source says something different about the shelf life of whole grain flour, but this source says 6-8 months in the fridge, 2 years in the freezer. I’m guessing that’s a bit generous, but if you are baking regularly your flour won’t last that long anyway. 4. Grind your own. The best way to ensure fresh flour is to grind your own from whole wheat berries just before baking. I do this in small quantities (2 cups at a time) with my Vitamix and I’ve been quite satisfied with the results. If you are ready in invest in (and have the space for) a grain grinder, I have heard good things about the Nutrimill. Either way, either grind just enough for your recipe or grind extra and store tightly sealed in fridge or freezer. And then bake some honey oatmeal bread or graham cracker bites! [...]

    Reply

  3. [...] The best way to ensure fresh flour is to grind your own from whole wheat berries just before baking. I do this in small quantities (2 cups at a time) with my Vitamix and I’ve been quite satisfied with the results. If you are ready in invest in (and have the space for) a grain grinder, I have heard good things about the Nutrimill. Either way, either grind just enough for your recipe or grind extra and store tightly sealed in fridge or freezer. And then bake some honey oatmeal bread or graham cracker bites! [...]

    Reply

  4. [...] out there, instead of buying my bread and crackers and granola from the store, I do my best to make them myself. And if I’m going to go through the effort of making them myself, I want them to be as [...]

    Reply

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