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Today we’re going to talk all about honey, specifically raw honey. Just what is it that makes raw honey superior to pasteurized honey? Raw honey is vastly different than its pasteurized counterpart. Honey that has never been heated to more than 117 degrees has numerous benefits over refined sweeteners.

Raw honey is an alkaline-forming food that contains natural vitamins, enzymes, powerful antioxidants and other important natural nutrients. These are the very nutrients that are destroyed during the heating and pasteurization process. In fact, pasteurized honey is equivalent to and just as unhealthy as eating refined sugar.  ”  – Raw honey is an alkaline-forming food that contains natural vitamins, enzymes, powerful antioxidants and other important natural nutrients. These are the very nutrients that are destroyed during the heating and pasteurization process. In fact, pasteurized honey is equivalent to and just as unhealthy as eating refined sugar. Learn more: Source

The Many Benefits of Raw Honey

Raw honey is a rich source of enzymes, called amylase, that help digest carbohydrates. Amylase comes from the pollen of flowers. Did you know that as soon as you apply honey to bread (or other starchy items) it immediately starts to predigest it for you, which means less work for your body to digest the food? This makes unpasteurized honey an ideal sweetener to use on breads, in your oatmeal for breakfast or with any other starchy food you’d like to sweeten.

Raw honey is anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and helps to strengthen the immune system.  Raw honey is also known to eliminate allergies and act as an expectorant for treating conditions such as bronchitis and asthma. When using raw honey for allergies it is best to find a local source that will contain the pollen from the area where you live.

Using Raw Honey for Home Remedies

  • Treat Seasonal Allergies– To use honey as a treatment for seasonal allergies start by taking a teaspoonful of raw, local honey each day for several weeks leading up to allergy season.
  • Facial Mask– Honey is supposed to be soothing to the skin, fight blemishes, promote smoothness, fight wrinkles, and help your skin tone. To use it as a facial mask, apply a teaspoon of raw honey to your face and allow it to set for 10-30 minutes before rinsing it off with cool water.
  • Ease Sore Throats– Raw honey can be taken as a way to help ease sore throats and works well in combination with fresh lemon juice.
  • Raw Honey for Storage– Raw honey has an indefinite shelf life, due to the natural enzymes it contains. This makes it an ideal candidate for long term storage to keep on hand in case of emergency. If the honey starts to crystallize, simply put the jar in a bath of warm water and the honey will return to a liquid state.
  • Treat Cuts, Burns and Scrapes– Due to its natural anti-bacterial components, raw honey makes a perfect, natural treatment for small cuts, scrapes, and burns and it may also help to decrease scarring. Simply apply a small amount of honey to the wound and cover with a sterile bandage. Change the wound dressing at least daily.

Different Types of Honey

There are different types of honey that are made according to the bee’s primary nectar source at the time they made that honeycomb. This will affect the color, aroma and flavor of the honey. The color of honey may range from a dark brown to nearly clear and it can vary from having a very mild taste to a very distinct taste. Did you know that there are over 300 kinds of honey available in the USA?

As a rule of thumb, the lighter the color of the honey, the milder the flavor and conversely, the darker the color the bolder the flavor. Let’s talk about a few of the most popular varieties of honey available.

  • Tupelo– Tupelo honey is produced in the southern part of the United States from the nectar of Tupelo trees. It is an extra light amber honey with a pleasant, mild flavor. This honey will not granulate.
  • Buckwheat- Buckwheat grows wild and is a gluten free plant the is used for breakfast porridge and flour, Buckwheat honey is dark brown with a very strong flavor. It is perfect for barbecue sauce and baked goods.
  • Clover– Clover is probably the most commonly recognized type of honey. Depending on the type of clover it may vary anywhere from an almost white color to a very pale amber. It has a mild flavor and is the most common “table honey.”
  • Alfalfa– Honey that is mild and light in color produced from the purple blossoms of the alfalfa plant. It is very common in the USA.
  • Wildflower– This term is usually used to describe honey where the source of the nectar is unknown.
  • Avocado– Avocado honey is made from avocado blossoms and comes primarily from California. It is a very rich honey with an almost buttery taste.

Note: Raw honey should never be given to infants under the age of 12 months. They lack the stomach acid to deactivate spores in the honey.

Do you use raw honey? How much do you pay per quart?

Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4

This is the writings of:

jill

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14 Comments

  1. LOVE raw honey! We eat a spoonful daily.

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  2. Love raw honey! We eat a spoonful daily. I get it at my local farmers market and pay about $18 for 2 pounds

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  3. Love raw honey here. I bought a mini bear of wildflower raw honey, oh boy it is way too sweet! I plan to refill the mini bear with the usual raw honey I buy. I think a quart is around $11-12 at the grocery.

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  4. Yay! We love raw honey. Or I do, at least :D. My husband and son don’t care for it. I use it to chase down my raw apple cider vinegar :). I pay about $11 for a quart of local honey I think :). Give or take :).

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  5. My daughters and husband just love raw honey over any other kind of honey. They somehow figured out it was the best one for them. I pay $6 for 22 oz at Vitacost.

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  6. the island where my husband and i currently live is actually famous for honey. it costs about $5 US for a half-liter bottle. i asked a few friends, and they tell me the honey is never cooked. people here don’t keep bees – rather, the honey is gathered from the jungle by brave men who climb tall trees with a bundle of burning leaves to smoke the bees out of the nests! they bring the whole hive home & squeeze out the honey. i once was invited to eat the grilled bee larvae after a successful honey-hunting trip!

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  7. Honey is one of the few sweeteners we use. We live in CA so we get sage and avocado honey. For two quarts in my CSA I pay $15

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  8. We love raw honey. I just found a local man who sells us his wildflower raw honey for $115 for a 4 gallon bucket, which is 46 lbs. This will last us about 5-6 months. This is a great deal in our area!! I was paying $11 a quart at the health food store for somewhat local (30 miles away) raw honey before. We use raw honey in place of almost all recipes that call for sugar.

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  9. i LOVE honey. but it wasn’t until a trip and tasting to the farmer’s market that i discovered that love. i’d only ever had the super processed unhappy honey up until that point and had sworn off it for years because it just tasted “icky” to me. but a very old man, with very good raw honey, has reformed me. i had no idea though about all the different types. ya learn something new, right? :)

    thank you for taking the time to link up with us at the Wednesday Fresh Foods Blog Hop! We hope to see you again this Wednesday with more fantastic seasonal & real food posts :) xo, kristy

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  10. Love raw honey mixed with homemade goats milk chevre. It’s about $14.00 for a quart. I get it from a guy that has over twenty different varieties and they’re amazing.

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  11. […] Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal… and it tastes a.w.e.s.o.m.e. Here is an older post that tells you about the many benefits of raw […]

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  12. […] Dessert is fun! And you can enjoy it without the guilt when using natural sweeteners such as raw honey, maple syrup, and fruit, and replacing the white flour with sprouted flours, almond flour, or […]

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  13. […] locations will likely carry different different types – each with different flavors so be sure you know what you are getting. Some are far sweeter […]

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  14. […] locations will likely carry different different types – each with different flavors so be sure you know what you are getting. Some are far sweeter […]

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